Peyton Manning Needs No Luck To Be Great

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As Peyton Manning prepares to return to face his old team the Indianapolis Colts for the first time since he departed, he will not need  luck to either win or perform—he is having brilliant year in a Hall of Fame Career.

As humans it seems to be part of our DNA to attribute both the unexplainable and the disappointing to the idea that things are either predetermined or meant to be.

You can rest assured that if Manning has any say in the matter the outcome will not be left in the hands of the Gods, because those that are better, more prepared, and practiced are much less likely to be at the mercy of fate.

While some may think the outcome of a game is  determined by fate or luck—as many lament that it was “not meant to be” after a tough loss, the winner of this game will have played a better game, or perhaps been subject to random chance happenings beyond their control.

It has been my experience that people attribute things externally to both console and comfort themselves and others when things seem both incomprehensible, and perhaps excessively painful.  They do this in many situations such as. when they do not get promotions, when a romance breaks up or when someone passes.

By attributing things to fate, it can at times not allow people to potentially explore their own as well as other peoples roles in the outcome—if there was in fact any.  Also being sufficiently introspective helps one when they are confronted the next time by a similar predicament or circumstance.

It is not uncommon for people to attribute behaviors, outcomes and performance to a higher power and often invoke God and religion in an attempt to explain, soothe and cope with both tragic and non-tragic events.

Living in a world where so many things happen due to random chance happening and are unexplainable, it is both logical and soothing to do such, and if it is helpful—why not?

The game between the Broncos and Colts is being billed as both a return to Indy of their favorite son Manning and a match-up between the new and old, as many have been eager to make comparisons between Manning and his replacement Andrew Luck.

Manning is without a doubt not only one of the greatest quarterbacks of all time but most likely the brightest. His cerebral preparation and practice habits have provided him a career that few can ever dream of having—and he seems far from done.

While some may think that a higher power is looking down on the field today watching the game from the cosmos with perhaps both the winners, losers and fans consoling themselves with that ideation after the game, it is far more likely the case that the better team will win today.

But if the Gods are in fact going to play a role in today’s game and there is no way of telling if or how they will—they generally favor those that are better and most prepared.  After all why intervene when you do not have to?

For More On Peyton Manning: http://psychologyofsports.com/2013/09/30/peyton-manning-and-tom-brady-out-with-the-new-and-in-with-the-old/